Braunthal Reports

The Braunthal Reports are named after the Founder of The Bonnart Trust. Freddy Bonnart-Braunthal set up the trust in 2002 to “establish and maintain scholarships at universities in the United Kingdom for research at the postgraduate level into the nature of racial, religious and cultural intolerance with a view to finding a means to combat it”.

Freddy had personal experience of prejudice. At the outbreak of WWII he was studying economics at LSE and was evacuated to Cambridge, but in 1940 he was labelled an ‘enemy alien’ and interned to a camp in Canada for 10 months. He was eventually allowed to return to Britain to fight against Nazism. On joining the army in 1943, he changed his name to Frederick Bonnart. However, he was determined that his original name be preserved and associated with the actions of the Trust – hence we are calling these papers The Braunthal Reports.

The Braunthal Reports are based on analysis and recommendations drawn from the dissertations submitted for a doctorate by the Scholars funded by The Bonnart Trust.

 

The first in a series of Braunthal Reports: Contesting identity and preventing belonging: an analysis of British counter-terrorism policy since the Terrorism Act 2000 and the selective application of the terrorism label in the United Kingdom